Talk to Frank resources-for-family

About Talk To Frank

In the UK, Talk to Frank has been operating the anti-drugs campaign for a long time on its own. But has it actually worked and stopped drug use?

Ten years prior a police Swat group collided with a calm suburban kitchen and transformed the substance of medication education in the UK until the end of time. People were seriously warned to stay away from the drug peddlers around sports arenas and that they could be destroyed by drugs. A sort of comedy was also brought into the message in the bid to pass it appropriately.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. There was also a new message Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

One can actually say that Frank which was a brain child of "Mother" ad firm became the new National Drugs Helpline Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. In the bid to make the Frank label a very popular one among the young people in the country, programs like the tour round a brain house, and Pablo the canine drugs mule were all incorporated.


The agency behind Frank has said that it was crucial that Frank was never actually seen so he could never be the target of ridicule for wearing the wrong thing or trying to be cool. Many people have high regard for the YouTube spoof videos of Frank too. There is additionally no sign that Frank is a specialist of the services, something that makes it uncommon in the annals of government-supported movements.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Majority of the ads in Europe now follow the footsteps of Frank in trying to be sincere and allowing the teenagers the right to choose. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. But the scare tactics is still prevalent in majority of the campaigns against drugs around the globe, especially the "descent into hell" which is drug inspired. One example is one of the DrugsNot4Me series in Canada that revealed how a very pretty confident woman slipped into deep-eyed wreck because of drugs.

Research that was done on a UK anti-drug campaign between 1999 and 2004 shows that describing the negative effects of abuse will often actually encourage young people "on the margins of society" to use drugs.


The opposition Conservative politicians were initially against Frank, simply because it pointed out the ups and downs of drug use, but it made giant strides.


An early ad posted online told viewers, "Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world."

Balancing the message is not always easy to get right. The person behind this cocaine ad has said that he now thinks he thought the average person browsing the web had a longer attention span. The negative effects were given at the end of the animated ad and some viewers might not have watched the whole thing. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

According to the Home Office, 67% of younger people in a survey stated that they would ask Frank if they required advice on drugs. In 2011 and 2012, Frank received 225,892 calls and 3,341,777 visits to the website. It is evidence that the method is effective.

But, we don't have any proofs that people have quit drug consumption because of Frank, just as we don't have such evidence in cases of other media campaigns against drugs.

Drug usage in the UK has gone around 9% in the decade since the conflict propelled, yet specialists say quite a bit of this is down to a decrease in cannabis utilization, potentially connected to changing states of mind towards smoking tobacco among youngsters.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK was launched in 2003 as a collaborated effort of the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government as a national drug education service. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. A lot of media campaigns have been put out on both the radio and the internet.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Services

FRANK has the following resources for anyone looking for information about drugs

  • A website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email
  • A live private chat service that's available from 2 pm - 6 pm every day
  • Help in finding a rehab and treatment facility